Epiphany

Epiphany

Following the Star

The feast of Epiphany celebrates the appearance of Jesus to the magi, or wise men, as told in the gospel of Matthew. The traditional date of Epiphany is January 6, but many churches celebrate it on the Sunday in January preceding the 6th. Epiphany is also the season in the church year from the feast of Epiphany until the feast of the Presentation of Christ in the Temple. See Christmas.

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Lent

Lent

Winter Retreat

During the six weeks of Lent we prepare our hearts through prayer, penance, and almsgiving, to celebrate the greatest feast of the church year, Easter, and to receive anew the gift of the Light of Christ which, through his death and resurrection, transcends time and space and can never be extinguished. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lent

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Easter & Pentecost

Easter & Pentecost

Resurrection Here and Now

Easter is the greatest feast of the church year. Easter Sunday is the last of the three day observance called the triduum: Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday, when we celebrate Christ’s death and resurrection. On Easter, the Light that came into the world with Jesus’ birth at Christmas, that died on Good Friday and was buried in the tomb, rises anew as an even greater Light that can never be extinguished, a Light that is available to all, unlimited by time and space. The season of Easter lasts 50 days and ends with the feast of Pentecost. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter

Pentecost, a Greek word meaning, “the fiftieth day,” is the Greek name for the Feast of Weeks, traditionally an agricultural festival for ancient Israel which celebrates the giving of the Law at Sinai, which is celebrated today as Shavuot. In the church, Pentecost celebrates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples who were gathered in the upper room on the day of the Feast of Weeks. See Acts 2 and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentecost

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Ordinary Time

Ordinary Time

Growing Time

The time following a feast day and before the time of preparation for a feast is called Ordinary Time. In the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd we call ordinary time growing time because that is when we use the gifts we have received from God during the feast to grow further in our relationship with God. “The English name ‘ordinary time’ translates the latin term Tempus per annum (literally ‘time through the year’).”                                                                                                                – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordinary_Time

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Advent & Christmas

Advent & Christmas

Preparing for the Light

Advent is the first season of the church year, encompassing the four weeks of preparation leading up to Christmas. The name Advent is an anglicized version of the Latin word adventus, meaning “coming.”  In the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, Moravian, Presbyterian and Methodist calendars, Advent starts on the fourth Sunday before December 25.

“Latin adventus is the translation of the Greek word parousia, commonly used to refer to the Second Coming of Christ, when God will be all in all. [1 Corinthians 15:28] For Christians, the season of Advent anticipates the coming of Christ from two different perspectives. The season offers the opportunity to share in the ancient longing for the coming of the Messiah, and to be alert for his Second Coming.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advent

Christmas is both feast day and a season when we celebrate the birth of Christ the Light into the world. In the church, the Christmas season lasts twelve days, from Christmas day through the feast of the Epiphany on January 6th.

“Many Protestant churches add an Epiphany season after the Christmas season, extending the celebration of Christmas for forty days until the feast of the Presentation of Christ in the Temple (Candlemas) on 2 February (or a nearby Sunday). In the  Roman rite, since 1970, the Christmas season runs a shorter period, from Christmas Eve to the Baptism of the Lord, which, depending on the place and the year, can occur between 7 January and 13 January.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmastide

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